The Boxing Kings, Two Years Later

The Boxing Kings, Two Years Later

Today marks two years since the publication of The Boxing Kings.

Ross Perot, Quentin Tarantino, & Charles Manson

Ross Perot, Quentin Tarantino, & Charles Manson

No, this isn’t an answer from Carnac the Magnificent, but just a note on two recent articles of mine that I had meant to note here earlier.

Jack Dempsey Changed Everything

Jack Dempsey Changed Everything

His performance in Toledo on July 4, 1919 has never been equaled, both in terms of its physical realities and in the impact it would have on boxing and on sports.

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Rocky Marciano

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Rocky Marciano

If the quantity of Marciano books is unimpressive, the quality is high.

Horror-Film Hosannas, and Hesitations

Horror-Film Hosannas, and Hesitations

What am I doing sitting here, watching innocent people get their brains stomped in and their throats cut?

Gene Tunney and the Quality of Mercy

Gene Tunney and the Quality of Mercy

In defeating Tom Heeney, Tunney gave fight fans one last reminder of their ambivalence.

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Sonny Liston

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Sonny Liston

In death, he possesses a singular capacity to stimulate writers’ tough-guy fantasies and fondness for conspiracy theories.

Boxing's Longest Day: Sullivan v. Kilrain, July 8, 1889

Boxing's Longest Day: Sullivan v. Kilrain, July 8, 1889

In a legendary episode, they fought over an unimaginable distance—75 rounds, for two hours and 16 minutes, in 100-degree heat—before the issue was resolved.

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Joe Louis

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Joe Louis

When you read the history of the heavyweights, you’re reading a story that can be separated into BL and AL periods—Before Louis and After Louis.

Pure Art: Remembering William Nack

Pure Art: Remembering William Nack

Writers of any stripe should save his long-form portraits on their hard drives.

How Hot Was It?

How Hot Was It?

The temperature was about 105 degrees on that day in 1915 when Jack Johnson fought Jess Willard—unless it was closer to 70.

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Jack Johnson

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Jack Johnson

Like a protagonist in a Bob Dylan song, Jack Johnson was a trickster genius, never an easy man to characterize.

When Tokyo Was Tyson Town

When Tokyo Was Tyson Town

His 1988 battle with Tony Tubbs in Tokyo would be the last time that the world saw Tyson so serene, or at least stable. Storms were breaking around him. 

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: John L. Sullivan

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: John L. Sullivan

If you write about boxing, you ought to wake up every morning and thank him.

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Jack Dempsey

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Jack Dempsey

The Dempsey bibliography mirrors the man's own itinerant ways, in his early life—it's scattered, as he was, to the four winds.

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Floyd Patterson

The Heavyweight Bookshelf: Floyd Patterson

Few boxers of any era have given writers more to work with.

Jack Johnson Crosses the Line, 1908

Jack Johnson Crosses the Line, 1908

The first black man to win the heavyweight title, Johnson was breaking a color line first drawn by John L. Sullivan.

When the Champs Suited Up (and Didn't)

When the Champs Suited Up (and Didn't)

In honor of Veterans Day, some thoughts on the heavyweight champions and military service